October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and while adults do much to observe this cause, don’t forget that kids can make an impact, too!

TALK WITH YOUR CHILDREN HONESTLY ABOUT BREAST CANCER AND AT A LEVEL THEY CAN UNDERSTAND.


This is especially important if you or someone close to your child has breast cancer.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Thousands of women are affected by breast cancer each year — many are mothers, including mothers to children younger than 18. If you are diagnosed with breast cancer and have children, or are close with someone who has received a breast cancer diagnosis, you may wonder, “How do I tell my kids?” Here are a few tips to help navigate the conversation.

Answering the “why” questions. Children are curious and may want to know why their mom got breast cancer. Clarify from the beginning that your child did or said nothing that caused the illness, and that cancer is not like catching a cold. Many people find it helpful to discuss what they plan to say with their partner or a friend before talking with their children.

Use simple language. 


It’s best to use the word cancer from the beginning, and to use language that your children understand. Explain to them by pointing to the area affected and keep the words you use short and brief. If your child asks questions about death, be upfront with them. One response to a question about death could be: “Some people die from having cancer, but a lot of people also get better and live to be old.”

Added assurance. 


Through times of change, children need consistent routines and assurance that their needs will be met. Let them know you may not always be available, but that relatives, trusted friends and other caregivers are there to fill in for you until you feel strong again. Try to set a positive tone without promises and let them know that you have a team of doctors and nurses working to help you get better.

Listen. 


The questions your children ask are a way to understand what they want to know and what they understand. Listening helps you avoid talking above their level of understanding and possibly causing confusion. Encourage your children to express their feelings and remind them that it’s OK to ask questions.

CREATE A GIFT FOR SOMEONE YOU KNOW WITH BREAST CANCER … OR FOR A BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR.

Encourage kids to create a handmade gift for someone you know with breast cancer.

One thing a cancer patient does not need any more is stress. Offering to help with tasks like rides to treatments, house cleaning, feeding pets or driving kids to school/sports will lift a huge weight off your loved one’s shoulders. The less they focus on day-to-day chores, the more they can focus on getting better.

 


GET YOUR KIDS INVOLVED IN A FUNDRAISING WALK.

Taking the time to educate your students and allow them to interact with the community allows you to incorporate some valuable lessons in empathy and giving. Since kids aren’t generally allowed at actual patient facilities, you’ll need to choose a group, organization or individual that can use your support. Then choose one of these fun and rewarding activities!


 

Grab them now!

Sale Off
Fitch Baby- Animal Paradise Baby Bouncer (Pink)
QAR 269.00QAR 215.00
Sale Off
Baby Potty (Pink)
QAR 99.00QAR 79.00
Sunday,Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday
January,February,March,April,May,June,July,August,September,October,November,December
Not enough items available. Only [max] left.
Add to WishlistBrowse WishlistRemove Wishlist
Shopping cart

Your cart is empty.

Return To Shop

Add Order Note Edit Order Note
Add A Gift Wrap
Add A Coupon

Estimate Shipping

Do you want a gift wrap? Only

Add A Gift Wrap

Add A Coupon

Coupon code will work on checkout page

English

Select your language